2018 Christmas Wish List

Hey everyone!

Christmas is right around the corner and I have some new wishes for Santa! Incase you were wondering, I acquired two of the books from my 2017 wish listBlack Cool: One Thousand Streams of Blackness edited by Rebecca Walker and Always Another Country by Sisonke Msimang (which I’m currently reading). Below are books on my 2018 Christmas wish list:

(not in order of preference; click titles to read the blurbs on Goodreads)

 

Well-Read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, Discovering Ourselves edited by Glory Edim

I’ve already ordered by copy of Glory Edim’s Well-Read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, Discovering Ourselves, so this is definitely a Christmas treat to myself. We all love and relate to stories that specifically speak to us – us, black women; and this anthology prides itself on discussing the importance of recognizing ourselves in literature. I’m ready to be inspired by the contributors of this anthology and especially look forward to the pieces by Zinzi Clemmons, Gabourey Sidibe and Glory Edim! If you’ve already indulged in this anthology, how did you like it?


Filigree: Contemporary Black British Poetry edited by Nii Ayikwei Parkes + preface by Professor Dorothy Wang

 

Filigree typically refers to the finer elements of craftwork, the parts that are subtle; our Filigree anthology contains work that plays with the possibilities that the word suggests, work that is delicate, that responds to the idea of edging, to a comment on the marginalization of the darker voice. Filigree includes work from established Black British poets residing inside and outside the UK; new and younger emerging voices of Black Britain and Black poets who have made it their home as well as a selection of poets the Inscribe project has nurtured and continue to support

This anthology is fairly new – it was published November of this year. I hope to indulge in it soon and I especially look forward to the poems by the poets of Ghanaian descent: Victoria Adukwei Bulley, Nana-Essi Casely-Hayford, Louisa Adjoa Parker, as well as the other contributors! The collection is edited by Ghanaian-Brit writer/poet Nii Ayikwei Parkes (with a preface by Professor Dorothy Wang), so I know this anthology will be worth the read.


Talk Stories by Jamaica Kincaid

I’m a huge Jamaica Kincaid fan. I’ve read a good number of her work and still have a couple of books to finish before I can confidently declare that I’m an OG fan. Talk Stories (how chic is the book cover?!) is a book I’d love to add to my collection. It’s a collection of her original writing for the New Yorker’s ‘Talk of the Town’ column, where the young Kincaid (fresh from Antigua) wrote on her experiences in New York back in the late 1970’s – early 1980’s. I expect these stories to be humorous, thoughtful, slightly miserable and sensitive – in good ol’ Kincaid style!

Check out Jamaica Kincaid’s pieces from the 1970’s to the early 2000’s – The New Yorker


Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

Everyone has been raving about this short story collection! I’m seriously out of the loop. Some of my online bookish-friends describe this collection as intense, raw, too much – the list goes on. According to the blurb:

Adjei-Brenyah reveals the violence, injustice, and painful absurdities that black men and women contend with every day. These stories tackle urgent instances of racism and cultural unrest and explore the many ways we fight for humanity in an unforgiving world.’

Another thing that attracts me to this collection is that fact that Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah is of Ghanaian descent. If you follow me on social media (Bookstagram & Twitter), you’d know I’m all for supporting Ghanaian literature/Ghanaian writers, hence I created the #ReadGhanaian hashtag where readers can explore the plethora of books by Ghanaian writers out there. Friday Black is at the top of my TBR!


The Moor’s Account by Laila Lalami

I’ve read very few books by writers from Northern Africa. A couple of my friends claim The Moor’s Account is one of the best books they’ve ever read! I recently read an article where Gary Younge also praised Laila Lalami’s work, after reading a bunch of books by African women writers this year. It’s time for me to experience this brilliant novel as well! Lalami has a new novel coming out next year and I’d love to read The Moor’s Account first, as a great introduction to her work.


The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton 1965-2010 by Lucille Clifton

This collection is 720 pages! I’ve only read a few of Clifton’s poems online, or quotes from friends who are fans of her work. Her poem – won’t you celebrate with me is pure brilliance:

 

won’t you celebrate with me by Lucille Clifton

won’t you celebrate with me

what i have shaped into

a kind of life? i had no model.

born in babylon

both nonwhite and woman

what did i see to be except myself?

i made it up

here on this bridge between

starshine and clay,

my one hand holding tight

my other hand; come celebrate

with me that everyday

something has tried to kill me

and has failed.

[Source: Poetry Foundation]

 

These are the types of poems that speak to me directly. Poems like this are comforting and unforgettable. It’s written so eloquently, but echoes loudly. I’d be privileged to own any of Lucille Clifton’s work and the generations after me would benefit from The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton 1965-2010 as part of my collection of books as well.


What books are on your Christmas wish list? Please share some titles!

Happy Holidays & Merry Christmas, everyone!

 

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2017 Christmas Wish list

Hey everyone!

Christmas is right around the corner and I honestly have no business buying any new books, anytime soon! But a simple wish list won’t hurt, would it? Below are books I’d love Santa to drop into my imaginary Christmas stockings:

(not in order of preference; click titles to read the blurbs on Goodreads)

 

The Ways of White Folks by Langston Hughes

It’s been a while since I indulged in some Langston Hughes. The last time I enjoyed his work (poetry/ stories) was 5 years ago in college, for the myriad of American Studies, African American History and African American Literature classes I was taking. This short story collection is set in the 1920’s and 30’s – so you can be assured it explores racial tension between black and white folk and possibly tension within the black community. Is it me, or does Mr. Hughes look super hot on the book cover? I want it!


Still Can’t Do My Daughter’s Hair by William Evans

I never knew this collection even existed! I discovered this poetry collection and the author thanks to Black Book Quotes Bookstagram account, where Leila highlights a huge array of books by Black writers. How adorable is the cover art?! In this collection, Evans explores masculinity, fatherhood, family, and what it means to make a home as a black man in America today. Since this book is about 96 pages, I could easily read it via my Kindle app, but the cover art makes me want to buy the physical copy! It deserves a spot in my bookshelf.


Always Another Country: A Memoir of Exile and Home by Sisonke Msimang

If you’ve read All your faves are problematic: A brief history of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, stanning and the trap of #blackgirlmagic via Africa Is A Country, I’m sure you’d want to indulge in more of Msimang’s lucid writing. Jonathan Ball Publishers in South Africa released this memoir back in October of this year. Unfortunately, Sisonke Msimang hasn’t sold the book rights outside South Africa yet, so its unavailable online at the moment. In Always Another Country, Msimang takes readers from Zambia to Kenya, Canada, the US and South Africa as she reflects on childhood jealousies, adult passions, motherhood and ‘what it means to be born into a life scored by history.’ I want this book in my hands!


The House of Hunger by Dambudzo Marechera

The House of Hunger has been on my TBR for about 3 years. All the readers I know who’ve indulged in Marechera’s work claim him as an ultimate favorite. This novella portrays life in a Zimbabwean township and explores the lives of families living in black urban areas. Some readers have described this novella as ‘a masterpiece’ and ‘one of the greatest Zimbabwean novels of our time’ while using words like ‘brutal’, ‘sharp’, ‘disturbing’, ‘sublime’ to describe Marechera’s writing. I want to see/read what I’ve been missing out on! I hope to read this at some point in 2018.


Queer Africa 2 edited by Makhosazana Xaba and Karen Martin

This anthology (pub. 2017) is the sequel to Queer Africa: New and Collected Fiction which found great success back in 2013. It consists of 25 stories by writers from Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Uganda. The stories touch on “desire, disruption and dreams; others on longing, lust and love – a range of human emotions abound in lives of Africans and those of the Diaspora who identify variously along the long and fluid line of the sexuality, gender and sexual orientation spectrum in the African continent.” I absolutely love the colorful needlework on the book cover! Last time I checked, this anthology was quite pricey. I hope my local library gets this book soon so I can experience the stories.


Black Cool: One Thousand Streams of Blackness edited by Rebecca Walker

Whether you like it or not, BLACK people have defined what it means to be cool – worldwide. Black Cool, which is edited by well-known feminist – Rebecca Walker (Alice Walker’s daughter), explores the emergence of black cool, through essays by Mat Johnson, bell hooks, Margo Jefferson and more. Henry Louis Gates forwards the anthology with historical context, where he connects past African elements to the current concepts of ‘cool’. I’m mostly curious to know how the writers articulate the thousand streams of our blackness. Blackness embodies so many shades, cultures, countries, customs, beliefs. Blackness is surely NOT a monolith!


What books are on your Christmas wish list? Please share some titles!

Happy Holidays & Merry Christmas, everyone!

 

• Check out the 2016 Christmas wish list

2016 Christmas Wish List

Hey everyone!

Christmas is right around the corner! I honestly have no business buying any new books, anytime soon. But a simple wish list won’t hurt would it? Below are books I’d love Santa to drop into my imaginary Christmas stockings (not in order of preference; click titles to read the blurbs on Goodreads):

The Turner House by Angela Flournoy has been on my TBR for a while. It actually got bumped up my list after Flournoy was shortlisted for the National Book Prize last year + some of my friends highly recommend this novel. I hear there are similarities between The Turner House and Ayana Mathis’s The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, which I LOVED (and reviewed).


The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears by Dinaw Mengestu is a book I’m very keen to read. I haven’t read anything by Mengestu but I’ve seen many reviews of his books – especially his 2014 novel, All Our Names on several book blogs. I’m eager to read about the immigrant experience in the U.S through an Ethiopian lens in this book!


Birth of a Dream Weaver: A Memoir of a Writer’s Awakening by Ngūgī wa Thiong’o was released late October of this year. I found out about this book from highlights of the 2016 Aké Arts and Books Festival and was surprised this book existed, as I didn’t even know Ngūgī wa Thiong’o was actively writing a new memoir! I deeply enjoy anything Thiong’o writes, so this would be a great addition to my already growing Ngūgī wa Thiong’o collection.


Mo’ Meta Blues: The World According to Questlove by Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson has been on my TBR for a looong time. I love, love, love The Roots (hip hop group) and for those who don’t know, Questlove is the drummer and one of the leaders of the group (the other leader is rapper – Black Thought). My life was semi-complete when The Roots came to Middlebury back in 2009 and I admired Questlove’s finesse with the drums! He came out with another book this year – Something to Food About: Exploring Creativity with Innovative Chefs. But I hope to read Mo’ Meta Blues first!


Longthroat Memoirs: Soups, Sex and Nigerian Taste Buds by Yemisi Aribisala was published back in November (2016) by Cassava Republic. I have been waiting for a book like this for a while! If you’ve read my review of Pig Tails ‘n Breadfruit: A Culinary Memoir by Barbadian writer Austin Clarke (RIP), I spoke on my desire to read more books that highlight African food. Longthroat Memoirs showcases Nigerian cuisine while discussing various feminist issues. I need this book.


My Name is Leon by Kit de Waal has the best book cover! From what I hear, My Name is Leon is a story about 9 year old Leon – who is biracial and his new baby brother Jake – who is white. Once their mother is deemed unfit to care for them, they are taken into the foster care system. When Leon’s baby brother is adopted before he is, readers see Leon face various prejudices, while trying to save his broken family. I’m ready to have all the feels reading this book.


You Can’t Touch My Hair: And Other Things I Still Have To Explain by Phoebe Robinson looks like it’d be a great book to get anyone out of a reading slump. Every once in a while I like to let loose and read something humorous and light. The author, Phoebe Robinson – is a comedian and hosts a podcast with Jessica Williams called 2 Dope Queens. I’ve given their fun podcast a couple of listens and even downloaded a sample of this book on Kindle. All I can say is, I know I’ll be entertained by this book!


What books are on your Christmas wish list? Please share some titles!🙂

Happy Holidays & Merry Christmas, everyone!